Angela Slatter

A stunning, emotional and eclectic collection of fantasy and dark tales. These are the stories told to warn children, entertain adults and beguile all.

Introduction by Jack Dann.

Winner of the Aurealis Award for Best Collection.

 

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Guy Salvidge reviews Angela Slatter's The Girl With No Hands and other tales and says many things that make us happy, including

The Girl With No Hands and Other Tales is a collection of intelligent, lusciously-written fairytales with modern sensibilities. In these pages, our heroines almost never bow before the might of their often-boorish fathers and husbands, and the resulting fare makes for highly entertaining reading.

You can read the full review at http://guysalvidge.wordpress.com/2012/01/02/book-review-the-girl-with-no-hands-and-other-tales-by-angela-slatter/

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The Girl with No Hands (and Other Tales)

In this collection of 16 previously published and new stories, Slatter presents twisted, fractured, illuminating fairy tales and dark fantasies that beguile in their elegant simplicity. Many of the stories are reiterations of classic fairy tales from all over the world. But by retelling the tales in a more intimate manner, Slatter illuminates the symbiotic relationship between pleasure and pain. The sexually candid “Bluebeard” is an empowering tale of a whore and her daughter who best a monster. The wholly original “The Living Book” personifies the intimate act of reading, while “Skin” reworks the Gaelic legend of the selkie into a tale of revenge and redemption from the seal woman’s perspective.

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The Canberra Times' Colin Steel reviews The Girl With No Hands and other tales

Brisbane based, Angela Slatter writes in the magical dark fantasy mould of Angela Carter. Slatter believes "colonised fairytales offer us a particular mode of living and interacting", which Jack Dann, in his introduction, says "explode the patriarchal messages embedded in traditional fairytales". Women thus strive to take control of their lives, for better or for worse. The overall standard of the sixteen stories is extremely high, particularly the haunting "The Jacaranda Wife", set in rural nineteenth century Australia, and "The Living Book" where a young woman is literally born to be read. Slatter also provides fascinating background to her stories in an Afterword. Slatter is an Australian author to watch.

(From Sunday Canberra Times, 30/01/11)

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Peter Tennant gives The Girl With No Hands and other tales a wonderfully indepth review in the latest issue of Black Static magazine. Angela is the featured writer in this issue, and is also interviewed at length.

"...but Toto we are most definitely not in the Forest of Arden anymore, said the master of mangled metaphors."

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The latest edition of the Slow Glass Books catalogue features Angela Slatter's The Girl With No Hands and Other Tales on its cover.

Issue 229 of the catalogue also features three other TP titles: Belong, Scary Kisses and Dead Sea Fruit. Dead Sea Fruit and The Girl With No Hands score a Recommended rating.

We're a little chuffed at making the cover, the first time in our 15-year history.

Slow Glass Books is Australia's largest sf, fantasy and horror mail-order bookstore. Their website can be found at www.slowglass.com.au. They have been stocking TP titles since 1996.

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